Projects

Communication is complicated. Face-to-face communication, which many would consider to be the simplest form of communication, becomes a challenge when you consider factors such as differences in language and culture, the use of body language, and tone of voice, etc. These factors inherently make text-based communication more difficult. This project seeks to address these issues through the research and design of communication systems and tools that allow users to gracefully convey such information effectively.
This project involves the design and evaluation of an interactive computer game that allows deaf children to practice their American Sign Language skills. The game includes an automatic sign language recognition component utilizing computer vision and wireless accelerometers. The project is a collaboration with Dr. Harley Hamilton at the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf.
CopyCat and PopSign are two games that help deaf children and their parents acquire language skills in American Sign Language.  95% of deaf children are born to hearing parents, and most of those parents never learn enough sign language to teach their children.  As short-term memory skills are learned from acquiring a language, many deaf children enter school with the short-term memory of fewer than 3 items, much less than hearing children of hearing parents or Deaf children of Deaf parents.  Our systems address this problem directly.
Every day, ordinary Internet users engage with complex copyright laws. Particularly in the context of creative work and appropriation, they are making decisions related to legal areas that are notoriously gray. Where legal knowledge is imperfect, social norms and ethical intuitions fill in the gaps. This research attempts to understand how these decisions are made, how norms and knowledge differ in different creative communities, and what lessons can be derived from online community management and design.
COSMOS (COmputational Skins for Multi-functional Objects and Systems) is an interdisciplinary collaborative project to design, manufacture, fabricate, and apply "computational skins". COSMOS consist of dense, high-performance, seamlessly-networked, ambiently-powered computational nodes in the form of 2D flexible surfaces that can process, store, and communicate sensor data. Achieving this vision will redefine the basis of human-environment interactions by creating a world in which everyday objects and information technology become inextricably entangled.
This project introduces a new simulation technique to enable detailed dexterous manipulation of cloth. Without reimplementation or substantial modification, existing cloth simulators can only be used to approximate limited interaction between cloth and rigid bodies due to the incorrect computation of contact forces. For example, a simple scenario of two fingers pinching a piece of cloth often results in the cloth slipping out of the hand. Our technique provides a simple solution to cloth-rigid coupling using existing cloth and rigid body simulators as-is.
Social media has quickly risen to prominence as a news source, yet lingering doubts remain about its ability to spread rumor and misinformation. Systematically studying this phenomenon, however, has been difficult due to the need to collect large-scale, unbiased data along with in-situ judgements of its accuracy. In this paper we present CREDBANK, a corpus designed to bridge this gap by systematically combining machine and human computation. Specifically, CREDBANK is a corpus of tweets, topics, events and associated human credibility judgements.
In 2000 the United Nations announced the Millennium Development Goals, a set of development targets and objectives to reduce poverty and improve health, education, and the environment. These goals are set to be completed by 2015. The system of United Nations organizations is currently formulating a new set of development goals for beyond 2015. To create a more participatory process, the International Telecommunication Union uses an online platform to crowdsource the ideas and comments of youth around the world.
Designing effective CSCW systems in healthcare requires a careful consideration of the entire enterprise. This study uses computational text analysis and network visualization of topical terms and keywords to map the extant knowledge domain of CSCW in healthcare. The results are framed using a multi-level enterprise model, comprised of people, technology, process, and organization. Emerging trends and prominent patterns are identified. The study contributes to a broader understanding of CSCW research in healthcare and demonstrates the value of adapting an enterprise (as a) system lens.
A key idea in CSLearning4U is that we can design CS learning opportunities. Simply wrestling an interpreter or compiler can't be the best way to learn about computer science. Throwing people into the deep end of the pool can teach people to swim, but there are better ways. We want to do better than a book for CS learning, and we want to design the phonics of computing education to integrate with the "whole language learning" of programming.
The Public Lab for Open Science and Technology (Public Lab) is a civic science community of organizers and scientists democratizing environmental science by developing low cost DIY environmental monitoring tools. Public Lab facilitates collaboration and documentation of research through a community built website which allows community members to post wiki pages, research notes, activities, questions and answers, and events. This project investigates the relationship between the data these features cultivate and the cultivation of the community that produces that very data.
CulturEat is an application that bridges the skilled home chefs or cooks with urban diners who are looking for authentic and affordable cultural meals. It gives the cooks the ability to upload their masterpieces and sell them to earn extra income while sharing cultural heritage/stories of the dish with diners. It helps to restructure the current societal food sharing system and promote positive cultural impacts on social cohesion via food.
We present our work on computing an average curve given a set of planar input curves, with select applications. This work, to be soon presented at the Symposium on Geometric and Physical Modeling, provides a mathematical formulation and a fast algorithm for the problem of finding an average curve, given a set of input curves. Applications in the field of animation and statistical analysis are highlighted.

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